The student blog projects are going well. Today, there was buzz among the students because a real scientist(!) commented on a student’s blog. It has been wonderful that people outside of the course have been finding and commenting on the students’ work. I appreciate it, and so do the students.

It is about time that I aggregated all of the blogs to make them easily accessible to anyone who wants to see what the students are up to.

Below is a list, in alphabetical order by blog title. (On a side note, below is also what I consider a true test of my instructorship: I attempt to accurately summarize each student’s project in a single sentence.) I only list student names for those who have explicitly listed their name in the About or URL of their blog.

Adventures in the Intertidal. Kelsey is an Honours student interested in if (or perhaps how) brittle stars perceive light.

AliceinCanada. Alice is working with Maia (her own link also appears in the list, below) to investigate how hermit crabs perceive the “virtual bodies” that are their shells.

The Aquaculturist. This student is comparing feeding preference of Northern Abalone for two kelp species.

biologistblair. Blair and another student (link also below) are studying habitat preference of Northern Abalone, and how bacteria may moderate this.

darwinsdisciples. Davis (and Clara, again see below) are comparing arm regeneration rate in two brittle star species.

D’une goutte à l’autre. This student is part of a team of three who are interested in how nudibranch feeding preference is affected by predators and if this is mediated by nudibranch size.

fortunate adventures This student (and Lee) are working to compare (by growth and productivity) two species of kelp as potential candidates for integrated multi-trophic aquaculture.

From Land to Sea Maia is working with Alice to investigate how hermit crabs perceive the “virtual bodies” that are their shells.

Getting my Sea Legs. This student is interested in how seaweed species (particularly invasives) disperse.

Life in the tide pool. Tim is working with Dom to measure how biodiversity of animals living in kelp holdfasts changes with wave exposure.

Life is much better where it’s wetter. This student is part of the team investigating how nudibranch feeding preference is affected by predators and if this is mediated by nudibranch size.

The Little Biologist. Stephanie is an Honours student comparing the effects of different anti-fouling paints on larval settlement of an invasive tunicate.

Marine Science – back to front. Dom is working with Tim to measure how biodiversity of animals living in kelp holdfasts changes with wave exposure.

rainorshine-marine biology time. Rihana is interested in habituation and is studying how marine tube worms balance the trade-off between feeding opportunity and vulnerability to predation.

ScienceDoo. Clara is working with Davis to compare arm regeneration rate in two brittle star species.

she sees sea shells. Sophie is the third student in the nudibranch team and is interested in how nudibranch feeding preference is affected by predators and if this is mediated by nudibranch size.

soulfulsealover. This student is interested in how wave forces shape the ecology and evolution of intertidal organisms and is working with Christina to measure the force needed to dislodge isopods from different species of seaweeds.

Sun Sand Surf…and Science! Lee is working with another student to compare (using growth and productivity) two species of kelp as potential candidates for integrated multi-trophic aquaculture.

teaghanmayers. Teaghan is testing whether black turban snails prefer to eat upright or crustose forms of a single algal species.

The Transient Biologist. Christina is working with soulfulsealover to measure the force needed to dislodge isopods from different species of seaweeds.

Under the Sea. Jamie is an Honours student interested in potential ecological drivers for colour polymorphism in ochre sea stars.

whale of fortune. This student is working with biologistblair to study habitat preference of Northern Abalone, and how bacteria may moderate this.

whitewaterocean. Joel is measuring the magnitude of the flight response of Northern Abalone that are threatened by a predator.

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